The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Volume II: Gloomy Winter is Noo Awa

£10.99 includes P&P

Released 2010 | Format: CD | ref: CDBAR010 | Usually ships within 1-2 days


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A magnificent recording – Scottish folk music at its best.

The eagerly awaited sequel in the unprecedented five-volume project to record all of Tannahill’s songs, produced by Dr. Fred Freeman and featuring a host of folk luminaries.

Singers: Steve Byrne, Fred Freeman, Nick Keir, Jim Malcolm, Marieke McBean, Brian Ó hEadhra, Lucy Pringle, Emily Smith

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TRACK LISTING

  1. My Mary (Jim Malcolm)
  2. Gloomy Winter’s Noo Awa (Emily Smith)
  3. One Night in my Youth (Brian O hEadhra)
  4. Brave Lewie Roy (Nick Keir)
  5. The Soldier’s Adieu (Steve Byrne)
  6. While the Grey Pinioned Lark (Emily Smith)
  7. Fragment of a Scottish Ballad (Lucy Pringle)
  8. Bonnie Winsome Mary (Brian O hEadhra)
  9. Come Hame Tae Yer Lingels (Jim Malcolm)
  10. Oor Bonnie Scots Lads (Lucy Pringle)
  11. Hey Donald, How Donald (original version) (Marieke McBean)
  12. The Lomond (Steve Byrne)
  13. Peggy O’Rafferty (Brian O hEadhra)
  14. Mine Ain Dear Somebody (Emily Smith)
  15. O Lassie Will Ye Tak a Man? (Steve Byrne)
  16. Kitty Tyrell (Brian O hEadhra)
  17. O Sair I Rue the Witless Wish (Steve Byrne)
  18. Noo Winter Wi His Cloody Broo (Nick Keir)
  19. Poem: On Seeing a Spider.. (Fred Freeman)
  20. The Soldier’s Widow (Lucy Pringle)
  21. Bonnie Hielan Laddie (Jim Malcolm)

RELATED ITEMS

The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill – Volume I

The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill - Volume IThe Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Vol I Number one of a five album series in a ground-breaking project to record for the first time ever the entire works of this huge Scottish talent: a contemporary of Robert Burns, and Paisley’s most famous son. Produced by the legendary Dr. Fred Freeman, producer of The Complete Songs of Robert Burns. Featuring some of Scotland’s best singers and musicians. – Find out more.

The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill – Volume III

The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill - Volume IIIThe Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Vol III The third and, arguably, the best yet in the unprecedented five-volume project to record all of Tannahill’s songs, produced by Dr. Fred Freeman and featuring a host of folk luminaries, with singers including Rod Paterson, Ian Anderson, Nick Keir, Fiona Hunter, Brian Ó hEadhra and Lucy Pringle. – Find out more.

The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill – Volume IV

The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill - Volume IVThe Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Vol IV The fourth and penultimate volume in Dr Fred Freeman’s landmark recording series The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill reflects the breadth of influence that informed the Paisley weaver/poet’s compositions, including elements of Irish, Jewish and baroque music. As ever, these are married with Freeman’s fresh contemporary approach to arrangement and performance, as reflected in his top-drawer musical cast. – Find out more.


ABOUT ROBERT TANNAHILL

Robert Tannahill (1774-1810) is truly one of Scotland’s greatest songwriters, and yet, despite being considered in the same league as Burns, he has been largely overlooked by history. In an effort to redress this injustice, Sandy Brechin teamed up with renowned producer Dr Fred Freeman, who had previously produced The Complete Songs of Robert Burns 12 volume series, many of which Sandy played accordion on. Together they undertook to do the same for Robert Tannahill, recording for the first time ever all of his songs, even though many of his works are missing or incomplete.

Probably Tannahill’s most famous song is The Braes O Balquidder, with its chorus of “Will ye go, lassie go?”, the basis of the well-known song Wild Mountain Thyme, which was used as the title of the first album in the series.

Born in Paisley, Tannahill worked as a weaver, while writing beautiful poems and songs about nature, love and topics of the time with which he sympathised, such as the abolition of slavery, and the plight of the Highlanders after the Jacobite rebellions and the Irish immigrants who flooded into Glasgow looking for work, both of whom were discriminated against.

In the same way that Burns,  as well as being a poet, was also a musician (he played the fiddle), Tannahill himself played the flute and, like Burns, understood the importance of rhythm and melody in songwriting, and had a similar mastery of the craft.

Tragically, Tannahill committed suicide, partly due to publishers’ rejections, at the young age of 36. A hundred years later, in 1910, despite relative obscurity in his own lifetime, 15,000 people gathered to commemorate his death. Another 100 years later, the bicentennial of his death passed recently without much fanfare. Once again it seems he is being forgotten. Hopefully, this series will awaken consciousness anew in our nation, and possibly further afield, for this hero of our culture.